ABOUT

OUR ROOTS

The roots of the party go as far back as the Populist movements that sparked in the late 19th Century and early 20th Century. One of the major influences was the Peoples Party, which was a political party that advocated for Populism and Workers rights, Another being the Progressive Party, a party founded by Theodore Roosevelt with the goal of economic progressivism, social conservatism, and called for a rise of patriotism. Some of our early inspirations were politicians such as Huey Long, a governor who helped the state of Louisiana during the great depression with his "Share The Wealth" style of Distributism and Theodore Roosevelt who believed in putting our nation and its people first. ​

The People's National Party itself was founded on July 4th, 2020. Its members consisted of a mixture of former Democrats and Republicans who were angered with the Republican and Democratic establishment because they would not fulfill the needs of the people.

​"THEY'VE GOT A SET OF REPUBLICAN WAITERS ON ONE SIDE AND A SET OF DEMOCRATIC WAITERS ON THE OTHER SIDE, BUT NO MATTER WHICH SET OF WAITERS BRINGS YOU THE DISH, THE LEGISLATIVE GRUB IS ALL PREPARED IN THE SAME WALL STREET KITCHEN."

- HUEY LONG

OUR LEADERSHIP

ALEXANDER MCRAE

Chairman

AARON
HUNT

Chief of Staff

DIEGO MAXIMILIAN

Chief of Content Creation

SAMUEL
RIX

Director of Communications

READ PARTY PLATFORM

OUR INSPIRATIONS

THEODORE ROOSEVELT JR.

Theodore Roosevelt was not an ordinary politician. He was a war hero in the Spanish-American War, and nearly every American loved him. he combatted industrial monopolies, like Standard Oil and U.S. Steel which controlled nearly the entire market share of their respective industries. He started regulating the monopolies and attempted to find a balance between the interest of labor movements and the men who owned the companies.

READ MORE

HUEY PIERCE LONG

​Huey Pierce Long was a young and energetic man, Without the backing of the political establishment or business interests, he took his case straight to the people, covering the state of Louisiana with printed circulars attacking the corporate monopolies and delivering speeches in every town and crossroads in his district. He became governor, Senator, and was even preparing for a presidential run until his unfortunate assasination on September 8, 1935.

READ MORE

WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN

William Jennings Bryan was a devoutly religious man who adopted agrarian populism with the same degree of fervor he embraced his fundamentalist Christianity. He is one of the original American populists who's remembered for opposing big city politics, and fighting for the common farmer. Bryan’s legacy lives on in some of the policies he embraced in his political career, including the 8-hour workday, the direct election of United States senators, and the graduated income tax.

READ MORE

JAMES ELISHA FOLSOM SR.

James Elisha Folsom Sr, commonly known as Jim Folsom or Big Jim Folsom, was an American politician who served as the 42nd governor of the U.S. state of Alabama, having served from 1947 to 1951, and again from 1955 to 1959. He was the first Governor of Alabama who was born in the 20th century, and brought a true people's government to Alabama.

READ MORE

THEODORE ROOSEVELT JR.

Theodore Roosevelt was not an ordinary politician. He was a war hero in the Spanish-American War, and nearly every American loved him. he combatted industrial monopolies, like Standard Oil and U.S. Steel which controlled nearly the entire market share of their respective industries. He started regulating the monopolies and attempted to find a balance between the interest of labor movements and the men who owned the companies.

Roosevelt assumed the presidency at age 42 after McKinley was assassinated in September 1901. He remains the youngest person to become president of the United States. Roosevelt was a leader of the progressive movement and championed his "Square Deal" domestic policies, promising the average citizen fairness, breaking of trusts, regulation of railroads, and pure food and drugs. He prioritized conservation and established national parks, forests, and monuments intended to preserve the nation's natural resources. He ran in the 1912 presidential election and the split allowed the Democratic nominee Woodrow Wilson to win the election. Following the defeat, Roosevelt led a two-year expedition to the Amazon basin where he nearly died of tropical disease. During World War I, he criticized Wilson for keeping the country out of the war; his offer to lead volunteers to France was rejected. He considered running for president again in 1920, but his health continued to deteriorate. He died in 1919. He is generally ranked in polls of historians and political scientists as one of the greatest presidents in American history.

HUEY PIERCE LONG

Huey Pierce Long was a young and energetic man, Without the backing of the political establishment or business interests, he took his case straight to the people, blanketing the state of Louisiana with printed circulars attacking the corporate monopolies and delivering speeches in every town and crossroads in his district. He became governor, Senator, and was even preparing for a presidential run until his unfortunate assasination on September 8, 1935.

Long was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1930 but did not assume his seat until 1932. He argued that Standard Oil and Wall Street orchestrated American foreign policy. He was instrumental in securing Roosevelt's 1932 nomination but split with him in 1933, becoming a prominent critic of his New Deal. As an alternative, he proposed the Share Our Wealth program in 1934. To stimulate the economy, he advocated massive federal spending, a wealth tax, and wealth redistribution. These proposals drew wide support with millions joining local Share Our Wealth clubs. Poised for a 1936 presidential bid, Long was mortally wounded by a lone assassin in 1935. Although Long's movement faded, Roosevelt adopted many of his proposals in the Second New Deal, and Louisiana elections would be organized along anti- or pro-Long factions until the 1960s. He left behind a political dynasty that included his wife, Senator Rose McConnell Long; his son Senator Russell B. Long; and his brother, Governor Earl Long, among others.

WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN

William Jennings Bryan was a devoutly religious man who adopted agrarian populism with the same degree of fervor he embraced his fundamentalist Christianity. He is one of the original American populists who's remembered for opposing big city politics, and fighting for the common farmer. Bryan’s legacy lives on in some of the policies he embraced in his political career, including the 8-hour workday, the direct election of United States senators, and the graduated income tax.

Born and raised in Illinois, Bryan moved to Nebraska in the 1880s. He won election to the House of Representatives in the 1890 elections, served two terms, and made an unsuccessful run for the Senate in 1894. At the 1896 Democratic National Convention, Bryan delivered his "Cross of Gold" speech which attacked the gold standard and the eastern moneyed interests and crusaded for inflationary policies built around the expanded coinage of silver coins. In a repudiation of incumbent President Grover Cleveland and his conservative Bourbon Democrats, the Democratic convention nominated Bryan for president, making Bryan the youngest major party presidential nominee in U.S. history. Subsequently, Bryan was also nominated for president by the left-wing Populist Party, and many Populists would eventually follow Bryan into the Democratic Party. In the intensely-fought 1896 presidential election, the Republican, nominee, William McKinley emerged triumphant. At age 36, Bryan remains the youngest person in United States history to receive an electoral vote for president. Bryan gained fame as an orator, as he invented the national stumping tour when he reached an audience of 5 million people in 27 states in 1896.

BIG JIM FOLSOM

James Elisha Folsom Sr, commonly known as Jim Folsom or Big Jim Folsom, was an American politician who served as the 42nd governor of the U.S. state of Alabama, having served from 1947 to 1951, and again from 1955 to 1959. He was the first Governor of Alabama who was born in the 20th century, and brought a true people's government to Alabama.

Inspired by Huey Long's governorship and campaign tactics, Folsom utilized an extremely populist of campaign style. He would go around the state of Alabama with his country band dubbed "The Strawberry Pickers", and a bucket which he called "The Suds bucket". He promised that every dollar dropped in the bucket would be used to "scrub the Alabama State House clean". Although Folsom was immensely popular, his campaign ran on an incredibly low budget. Nonetheless he was determined even if the elites of the state were opposed to him, and his pockets weren't filled with cash to support the norms of a campaign at the time. Folsom made his mark when he was elected governor for the first time in 1946 on a populist platform attacking corporate interests and the corruption in government, and soon started cleaning up the Capitol as promised in his campaign. Folsom is an example of an average man making his way up in government, and if he could do it, it can be done again.